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dc.contributor.authorİslamoğlu, Mehmet Sami
dc.contributor.authorCengiz, Mahir
dc.contributor.authorBörkü Uysal, Betül
dc.contributor.authorİkitimur, Hande
dc.contributor.authorDemirbilek, Mahmut
dc.contributor.authorDokur, Mehmet
dc.contributor.authorSeyhan, Serhat
dc.contributor.authorKoç, Suna
dc.contributor.authorYavuzer, Serap
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-02T08:17:37Z
dc.date.available2021-12-02T08:17:37Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.issn1477-8939
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.tmaid.2021.102190
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12445/1611
dc.description.abstractBackground: Pneumonia due to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is spreading rapidly all over the world and air travel is the leading transmission route of the virus among countries. The aim of the study is to determine the frequency of SARS-CoV-2 Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in aircrew, to determine occupational exposure, and to understand the spread of immunity in social groups. Method: The study was designed as a cross-sectional retrospective study. SARS-CoV-2 IgG levels were measured in patients who applied to between December 1, 2020 and January 13, 2021. Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID19) Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positivity was investigated before December 1, 2020. Results: The patients were divided into three groups according to their jobs such as 313 aircrew; 451 healthcare workers; 4258 other patients. The PCR positivity rate was found to be 39% in the aircrew group, 32% in the healthcare workers and %20 other patient group (p < 0.001). The IgG antibody positivity rate was 46% in the aircrew, 41% in healthcare workers, and 35.3% in the other patient group (p < 0.001).The group with the highest IgG antibody titer is in the aircrew; there was a significant difference between the groups (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In our study, it was observed that aircrew, similar to healthcare workers, are at serious risk against SARS-CoV-2. In this process, it is suggested that the vaccination processes included repeated doses of aircrew should be accelerated and protective measures and equipment should be increased in terms of reinfection.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.tmaid.2021.102190en_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectCovid-19en_US
dc.subjectSars-Cov-2en_US
dc.subjectAntibodyen_US
dc.subjectAircrewen_US
dc.subjectHealthcare Workersen_US
dc.subjectSeroprevalenceen_US
dc.titleCOVID 19 seroconversion in the aircrew from Turkeyen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.journalTravel Medicine and Infectious Diseaseen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTıp Fakültesien_US
dc.identifier.volume44en_US
dc.identifier.startpage1en_US
dc.identifier.endpage4en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US


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